Quote analysis of john steinbecks of mice and men

His voice was growing warmer. We could have them for breakfast. Burroughs was an obvious target as it contained some of the most disturbing passages of its era, including lurid descriptions of sexual violence.

Quote analysis of john steinbecks of mice and men

Table of Contents Plot Overview Two migrant workers, George and Lennie, have been let off a bus miles away from the California farm where they are due to start work.

Overcome with thirst, the two stop in a clearing by a pool and decide to camp for the night. As the two converse, it becomes clear that Lennie has a mild mental disability, and is deeply devoted to George and dependent upon him for protection and guidance.

George finds that Lennie, who loves petting soft things but often accidentally kills them, has been carrying and stroking a dead mouse. George angrily throws it away, fearing that Lennie might catch a disease from the dead animal.

George complains loudly that his life would be easier without having to care for Lennie, but the reader senses that their friendship and devotion is mutual. George ends the night by treating Lennie to the story he often tells him about what life will be like in such an idyllic place.

The next day, the men report to the nearby ranch. He lies, explaining that they travel together because they are cousins and that a horse kicked Lennie in the head when he was a child.

Curley is newly married, possessive of his flirtatious wife, and full of jealous suspicion. Soon, the ranch-hands return from the fields for lunch, and George and Lennie meet Slim, the skilled mule driver who wields great authority on the ranch.

Slim comments on the rarity of friendship like that between George and Lennie.

Quote analysis of john steinbecks of mice and men

The next day, George confides in Slim that he and Lennie are not cousins, but have been friends since childhood. He tells how Lennie has often gotten them into trouble. Slim agrees to give Lennie one of his puppies, and Carlson continues to badger Candy to kill his old dog. When Slim agrees with Carlson, saying that death would be a welcome relief to the suffering animal, Candy gives in.

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Carlson, before leading the dog outside, promises to do the job painlessly. Slim goes to the barn to do some work, and Curley, who is maniacally searching for his wife, heads to the barn to accost Slim.

Study Guide to Quotes From Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men, With Analysis Literature Study Guides and Chapter Summaries / By Trent Lorcher / Homework Help & Study Guides Quote: We got a future. Tom Cameron of the Los Angeles Times wrote in that Of Mice and Men is a quintessential example of the "vividly striking realities with intellectual patterns" that characterize Steinbeck's best work, which he argues was lost upon Steinbeck's move to New York in (qtd. in Fensch 18). John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men is a touching tale of the friendship between two men--set against the backdrop of the United States during the depression of the s. Subtle in its characterization, the book addresses the real hopes and dreams of working-class America.

The three make a pact to let no one else know of their plan. Slim returns to the bunkhouse, berating Curley for his suspicions. Curley, searching for an easy target for his anger, finds Lennie and picks a fight with him.

Slim warns Curley that if he tries to get George and Lennie fired, he will be the laughingstock of the farm. The next night, most of the men go to the local brothel.

Lennie is left with Crooks, the lonely, black stable-hand, and Candy. This thought amuses her. The next day, Lennie accidentally kills his puppy in the barn.

Quote analysis of john steinbecks of mice and men

She admits that life with Curley is a disappointment, and wishes that she had followed her dream of becoming a movie star. Lennie tells her that he loves petting soft things, and she offers to let him feel her hair. When he grabs too tightly, she cries out. In his attempt to silence her, he accidentally breaks her neck.

Lennie flees back to a pool of the Salinas River that George had designated as a meeting place should either of them get into trouble. As the men back at the ranch discover what has happened and gather together a lynch party, George joins Lennie. As he describes the rabbits that Lennie will tend, the sound of the approaching lynch party grows louder.

George shoots his friend in the back of the head.

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When the other men arrive, George lets them believe that Lennie had the gun, and George wrestled it away from him and shot him.

Only Slim understands what has really happened, that George has killed his friend out of mercy. Slim consolingly leads him away, and the other men, completely puzzled, watch them leave.Of Mice and Men is a novella written by author John monstermanfilm.comhed in , it tells the story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced migrant ranch workers, who move from place to place in California in search of new job opportunities during the Great Depression in the United States..

Steinbeck based the novella on his own experiences working alongside migrant farm workers as a. John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, written in , deals with the experiences of two best friends, George Milton and Lennie Small. After Lennie gets into trouble in the California town of Weed, the.

Which brings me to John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men. In the book, two migrant workers, George and Lennie, have come to a ranch near Soledad, California, to find work. They speak of saving their stake so that they can one day buy a little place where they’ll “live off tha fatta the lan’,” as Lennie puts it.

Use these quotes to support your analysis of "Of Mice and Men" and to gain a greater understanding of John Steinbeck's novella. slide 1 of 6 Quote: We got a future.

Plot Overview We got a future.
SparkNotes: Of Mice and Men: Important Quotations Explained We got a future. We got somebody to talk to that gives a damn about us.
On John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men - PEN America Important Quotations Explained 1 Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world.

John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men is a parable about what it means to be human. Steinbeck's story of George and Lennie 's ambition of owning their own ranch, and the obstacles that stand in the way of that ambition, reveal the nature of dreams, dignity, loneliness, and sacrifice.

Of Mice and Men study guide contains a biography of John Steinbeck, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

Of Mice and Men: Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men | Book Summary & Study Guide | CliffsNotes